Current Issue

SHJ VOL 8, NO 1

 

CONTENTS

 

Table of Content

 

No abstract available for this article.   

 1

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REVIEW ARTICLE

 

COVID-19 and the Cardiovascular System

 

No abstract available for this article.  

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1-6

Bernard Gersh

covid-18, cardiovascular, system

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Serum fibrinogen level in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction admitted to the coronary care unit in Shaab Teaching Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan

 

Abstract:

Introduction Elevated serum fibrinogen level (SFL) is associated with increased risk of stroke and myocardial infarction. During ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEM°, SFL rises and appears to be influenced by several factors. This is a study of SFL in Sudanese patients with STEMI and its relationship to patient factors and hospital outcomes.

Methods:

The study was a prospective observational hospital-based conducted at Shaab Teaching Hospital in Khartoum, Sudan. Eighty consecutive patients with STEMI from July to September 2017 were enrolled. SFL was measured 72 hours post STEMI. Other recorded variables included demographic data, hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking status, thrombolysis use, hemodynamic instability and hospital mortality.

Results:

Eighty STEMI patients were enrolled with mean age of 54.9±10.6 years and M:F ratio of 3:1. Comorbidities prevalence: DM (43.8%), HTN (35%), smoking (46.3%), use of thrombolysis (78.8%) and hemodynamic instability (75%). No in-hospital mortality was recorded in the cohort. The mean SFL was 393.8 ± 100.1 mg/dl. 62 (77.5%) patients had SFL 350 mg/dl. Elevated SFL of 350 mg/dl had statistically significant relationship with age 40-60 years, female gender and smoking (P value 5 0.05), while P values were > 0.05 for DM, HTN, thrombolysis use and hemodynamic instability

Conclusion:

SFL in a cohort of Sudanese patients with STEMI was elevated but similar to reported levels and showed significant relationship with age 40-60 years, female gender, and smoking. No significant correlation was seen with HTN, DM, thrombolytic therapy or hospital outcomes.

 

 3

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7-12

Tadesse T. Tewolde,  Ahmed AA Suliman

Coronary Artery Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Stable

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CARDIOLOGY IMAGE

 

Left Main to Pulmonary Artery Fistula- Fascination Anomaly

 

No abstract available for this article.  

  4

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13-14

Sunil Gurmukhani, Mansi Nagori, Sandarbh Patel

left, main, pulmonary, artery, fistula, fascination, anomaly

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     STATEMENT

 

Statement from the Sudanese Society of Hypertension on Risks and Management of Hypertensive Patients During Covid-19 Pandemic

 

Abstract:
Hypertension is the single largest global contributor to disability-adjusted life years lost. The majority of the aged population have hypertension and appear to be at increased risk of COVID-19 infection. How hypertension modifies the risks and severity of COVID-19 infection and the implications for hypertension treatment is less clear. Therefore, there is currently no reason to discontinue RAS blockers in stable patients facing the COVID-19 pandemic. In COVID-19 patients with severe symptoms, sepsis, or hemodynamic instability, RAS blockers and other blood pressure lowering drugs should be used or discontinued on a case-by-case basis, taking into account current guidelines.  Careful and continuous research is vital for an understanding of the mechanisms underlying any additional risk from hypertension with COVID-19, and to determine the best and safest ways to treat those with severe manifestations of disease.

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15-23

Dina A. Hassan, Maha.I.Elamin, Hind M. Beheiry, Ibtisam A. Ali

statement, sudanese, society, hypertension, risk, management, covid-19

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SPECIAL CORRESPONDENCE

 

Impact of COVID-19 on cardiology services at AlShab Teaching Hospital

 

No abstract available for this article.  


9

 

 

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24-32


Ahmed A A Suliman1,2 , Abdellateef M A Abdelrahem


impact, covid-19, cardiology, services, alshab, hospital

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SYNERGY OR OVERLAP: NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE
A PLEA FOR COMPUTATIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MULTI-OMICS APPROACHES

 

Abstract:

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing in prevalence around the world. It is associated with the metabolic syndrome with cardiovascular disease the most usual cause of death. Clinical methods used to screen for NAFLD on a preliminary basis include the use of multiple algorithms, based on non-invasive serum biomarkers.  
The presence of NAFLD has been linked to surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease such as carotid intima-media thickness, the presence of carotid plaque, brachial artery vasodilatory responsiveness and CT coronary artery calcification scores. The issue of whether NAFLD is a cardiovascular risk factor itself needs to be fully determined, but it frequently coexists with insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.
There is no specific medical treatment for NAFLD and the evidence is incomplete with respect to the efficacy of interventions that reduce cardiovascular risk. Management of patients with NAFLD should involve identification of risk factors with key points being lifestyle change and the treatment of underlying diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Managing big data - which must be achieved and validated in advance as much as possible – should be processed by comprehensive computational epidemiology and “-omics” approaches, taking into account advanced research challenging heterogeneity. Validation and replication are mandatory before utilizing “-omic” biomarkers in diagnostics to identify patients at risk of advanced disease, including coronary heart disease.

 

 

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33-51


Guglielmo M. Trovato, Simon D. Taylor-Robinson

NAFLD, Diabetes, Cardiovascular, risk markers, Surrogate markers,  cardiovascular disease, Fatty liver disease

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